Tag Archives: Jesus

Isaiah 53:10-12.

The pericope for consideration continues the identity and mission of Isaiah’s servant. We find in the mysterious individual further paradoxes concerning the purpose of the individual’s life and actions. This servant has a difference about them that makes life appear in a world where sin and death reign. The servant surprisingly bears the crimes of the guilty making them right with the offended party (God). This part of the poem speaks about the result of a future victory and the hope of the servant standing in the end in triumph. It is in the ultimate task of absorbing death that the servant has changed the course of the rebels’ destiny.

            Often, we look to the New Testament writers to form our theology regarding salvation. For the Christian, it would be wise to look back to the Old Testament to get a better grasp at the foundations of such theological formations. In this passage (and the previous verses) we have important clues on how to think about what Jesus’ death and resurrection mean. Isaiah’s vision regarding the servant grounds itself in sacrificial language from Leviticus. The servant’s actions give writers like Paul in the NT the ability to put forth considerable conclusions regarding the sinner’s response to the actions of Jesus’ (arguably saving) actions.

            Obviously, the Christian is indebted to these passages in Isaiah (both in their own context and via the NT) for their formation of soteriology. It is eye opening to go back and read Isaiah without assuming Jesus as the fulfillment of this vision. Oswalt notes that Isaiah’s goal was not to produce a literal future prediction of Jesus’ entire ministry. However, the congruence with which the NT writers match up Jesus with the servant described by Isaiah is remarkable (408). The identity of the servant should be considered within Isaiah’s contexts before jumping to the NT’s illumination. Most of us must attempt to honestly approach this task in a backwards manner because of our Christian upbringing. It might need to be noted that I am not arguing that it is wrong to come to our soteriology “backwards”. In my opinion, it is very striking however, that when one studies Isaiah for its own sake, Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection are enhanced for their salvific significance rather than diminished.

            The human dilemma has become God’s priority in the biblical narrative (404). God’s solution, according to Isaiah, is a sacrificial human. This human has a servant role that is misunderstood completely. The important religious concepts such as holy and righteous are totally flipped upside down within Isaiah’s servant. The servant takes on the iniquities of the non-innocent. Oswalt highlights that this is not just symbolic but something that happens in reality. The righteous one makes others righteous by absorbing the world’s sins. This priest type figure offers themselves for the people’s sin. Unlike animals, this God-like human steps into the active place of substitution to make relationship with God wholly possible again (405).

            One’s future thinking about resurrection is hinted at in verse 10. As Oswalt points out, this does not necessarily speak of resurrection but that the servant’s life and death will not be in vain (402-403). I think that the bigger idea of death being dealt a “death-blow” is an appropriate image regarding the servant’s actions. God’s servant not only has a message, but the servant’s action accomplishes what no religion could (even Israel’s sacrificial system). Isaiah plants within this part of the poem further imagination regarding God’s heart and plan to deal with sin and its consequences. God does this through God’s servant in a powerfully absurd way that ends up victorious in the end. One’s theology regarding sin and redemption are given much ground to reflect on within these few verses. The servant further reveals God and the important fact that death loses when God gets actively involved. These thoughts should shape each of us as we ponder the Bible’s ultimate message regarding redemption and restoration.

Chapter 6 of Isaiah

Chapter six of Isaiah is a popular and central text in the whole of the book. Oswalt notes that it functions as a hinge between the chapters preceding and following it (173-175). This text is about response to an encounter with a holy God. This God emerges throughout the vision as one who has power and royalty. This God is actually the king of all reality in which Isaiah gets a glimpse. Isaiah’s response has wide spreading implications for God’s work in the world.

Many thoughts and questions arise when reading this chapter several times in a row. Isaiah’s vision, as Oswalt notes, is rooted in real time (176). Is the text highlighting a struggle for trust in earthly kings verses a reliance on God? An important king has died and the text immediately moves one’s mind from an earthy king to thinking about the King of all of the earth. The image of a temple filled with God’s presence reminds me of Genesis one and two where God’s inauguration is taking place. The earth is YHWH’s temple and full of God’s revelation.

The creatures in the vision have a unique description and fascinating job. They move about in attributing worth to King YHWH through unison covering and apparent repetitious praise chants. It is unique that in this vision Isaiah experiences the physical surroundings in tangible ways. The very building structure is being impacted by this encounter and the air has changed by the result of fire. The place where Isaiah finds himself has been radically changed by the one who is in the loud and smoky place.

The result of this scene is that Isaiah becomes acutely aware of his needy identity. Individually he recognizes with humble clarity that he is in need of grace. A mission from this moment is being born out of his own confession. He moves with further understanding to the idea that corporately the need is beyond just himself. The confession is a result of an evolving understanding that YHWH is king.

One of the creatures engages Isaiah’s response further by placing a hot coal against his lips. If this is an angelic being, why does the creature have to use tongs to grab a hot coal? Is this a further connection that the spiritual and material are closely intertwined? One must keep in mind the nature of the event happening is a vision. One cannot help but ponder the significance of these details. A theological suggestion is that it is not only “live” but it is consecrated to YHWH and therefore sacred.

The coal is pressed against Isaiah’s lips with a message of guilt removal and forgiveness of sins. I see an element of prevenient grace that Isaiah was able to confess at all. Does the seraph place it against his lips out of grace to simply point out that such a confession requires something sacred from a place of sacrifice? The next voice is a question from King YHWH. Isaiah’s response is one we would expect from such a spectacular meeting.

The message of sacrifice, I think, is encrypted in the imperatives given to Isaiah. It was from Isaiah’s own encounter that he must go and share a truth that will likely fall on deaf ears. Isaiah, like the people of God (and all humanity), have forgotten YHWH. Isaiah is called to give a hard message to a hard hearted people. However, it is in their familiarity that they have become blind. God encounter in the long run will always produce hope in those called to tell important news. Once sin has had its destructive day, God will continue his redemptive drama. 

Praise to this kind of King… The God-King of sacrifice. The God-Man (Jesus) of Resurrection is worthy of praise!

Works Cited:

Oswalt, John N. The Book of Isaiah: Chapters 1-39. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1986.